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All is not lost yet — YOUTH SCEAL

I talk about the implications of being diagnosed with lupus in my early 20’s on the Youth Sceal blog.

When were you diagnosed with the disease? What is the disease, how does it affect your body?
I was diagnosed with lupus (Systemic Lupus Erythematosus) in July 2016, at the age of 21, and like many other patients, I didn’t know about the disease before my diagnosis.

via All is not lost yet — YOUTH SCEAL

Delivering My First Presentation on Lupus

Earlier this week, I took the leap and went for something which had been at the back of my mind for a while now: deliver a presentation about lupus in my workplace. Though I still have a lot to learn about this disease, I talked about its symptoms, flares, possible complications and treatment options.

My presentation was followed by a Q&A session which turned out to be a beautiful moment of sharing. We addressed a range of topics, from the purely medical — such as tests used to diagnose lupus or side effects of medications— to more personal ones including how my colleagues can help me on a day-to-day basis, or the emotional impact of living with an unpredictable disease with potentially fatal complications.

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While I initially felt a little awkward to stand in front of a group of persons and talk about an illness which disrupted my life, it ended up being an incredibly enriching experience which further fueled my will to raise awareness about lupus. The month of July marks my first lupus diagnoversary, and this session proved to be a real gift.

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Concluding Lupus Awareness Month

You are 15 y’old when somebody asks you about your greatest fear and you answer “To suffer from a long-lasting illness”.

You are 21 y’old when the words “lupus, chronic, incurable, potentially fatal, lifelong treatment” hit you. And while you can rely on your healthcare practitioners, web resources and other patients, nothing had prepared you for your very own journey with The Wolf.

A journey made up of bruises, blood, ulcers, nausea, pain, weakness, dizziness. When your wrist and knuckles barely cooperate, making it hard to send a text message saying “I’m not feeling well”. When you want to place hot water bottles on your limbs but you can barely lift the kettle. When it takes you 30 mins and deep, deep breaths to get out of bed and reach for your medications. When you are exhausted but your ache is keeping you awake and you know that not getting enough sleep will make things worse. Ithurtsitburnsithrobs. It’s not stopping.

When you have more breakdowns that you would like to admit: because you did something wrong and got yourself sick, because you cannot attend the event you had been looking forward to for weeks, because you wish you could go back to ‘normal’. Because once again, you are telling yourself “I will never be able to do that”.

When your medications are a game of ironies, listing side effects such as: skin thinning, easy bruising, slow healing. And you smiled to how this juxtaposition alone could sum up the ‘new you’: thinning-bruising-healing.

And while living with The Wolf is making my life richer and brighter in multiple ways, it’s the difficulties which I wish to highlight to conclude Lupus Awareness Month. We talk about awareness in an effort to raise funds for research which will, someday, find a cure for this disease. But, above all, awareness is important for the 5 million of people across the globe who struggle with a disease which is greatly misunderstood.

Living in a body made up of too much this, not enough that. A body made up of rebellion.

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Illustration by Chiara Bautista

Lupus Awareness Month

It’s been nearly a year since I was diagnosed with lupus (S.L.E), a disease in which my immune system does not function properly and attacks my own body. This can cause damage to any body parts and lead to complications such as kidney failure, strokes, pleurisy or heart attacks among others. Lupus is incurable and it is believed that 10-15% of patients will die prematurely due to complications.

May is Lupus Awareness Month, with World Lupus Day celebrated on the 10th, and one super-awesome thing you can do is to simply set aside some time and LEARN about the disease. Go through a website, a patient’s blog, a video, or simply reach out and ask questions (I’m always willing and happy to discuss it!). Not only does lupus research lags behind but the illness is also widely unknown or misunderstood. Getting to know more about lupus is an easy but huge step in supporting those who live with it.

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